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Steering Group

Steering Group

The academic steering group includes eight academics from leading research groups across the UK who are joined by representatives from the commercial sector, in order to maintain industrial relevance (the industrial steering group).

The Early Career Researcher steering group work together to organise and manage ECR activity in the electronics community and organise the annual ECR workshop.

For more information on Steering Group members please follow the links to their profiles below.

Academic Steering Group Members

Professor Anthony O'Neill

Professor Anthony O'Neill

Newcastle University

Chair of eFutures

Anthony O'Neill joined Newcastle University in 1986, having previously worked at Plessey Research (Caswell) Ltd. He has been Siemens Professor of Microelectronics since 1996. He took a leading role in establishing eFutures, an EPSRC network aiming to maximise the impact of UK electronics research. His current research interests include: (i) integrating new materials with silicon for new/improved functionality, e.g. ferroelectrics; (ii) electrical and material properties of interfaces, e.g. improved conductivity at metal semiconductor contacts, improving electronic current in SiC MOSFETs (iii) engineering physical bio/electronic interfaces, e. g. optoelectrode arrays to control epilepsy using optogenetics, microelectrode systems for probing motor neuron disease; In 1994 he was Visiting Scientist at MIT, Cambridge, Ma, USA. In 2002 He became Royal Society Industry Fellow at Atmel, UK. He was a Visiting Professor at EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland in 2009 and at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia in 2017. He is the director of nanoLAB, Newcastle’s nano science and technology research centre and a director of the National Microelectronics Institute.

Professor Roger Woods

Professor Roger Woods

Professor Roger Woods leads the Programmable Systems Laboratory at Queen's University, Belfast with a £2M portfolio of grants from EPSRC, EU, NSF/Ireland funding. During the 1990's, he designed a number of innovative demonstrator chips that were commercialised and since then research interests have included heterogeneous computing architectures involving FPGAs for bioinformatics, data servers, defence and security. He has published over 190 papers. He is currently a member of the advisory board to the IEEE Signal Processing Society Technical Committee on the Design and Implementation of Signal Processing Systems and a past chairman of the IET’s Executive Team of the Technical and Professional Network on Microelectronics and Embedded Systems. In 2008, he co- founded Analytics Engines and acts as their Chief Scientist. He has acted as expert on STEM to the Northern Ireland Assembly.

Photo Dr Martin Trefzer

Dr Martin Trefzer

University of York

I am a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Electronic Engineering at York. My research interests include variability-aware analogue and digital hardware design, biologically motivated models of hardware design, evolutionary computation, and autonomous fault-tolerance. I am researching computational capabilities of CNTs, including direct evolution and reservoir computing models. My vision is to create novel architectures and autonomous systems, which are dynamically self-optimising and inherently fault-tolerant, by porting key enabling features and mechanisms from nature to hardware. I am/have been co-investigator on EPSRC-funded grants, Spin Inspired Representations (EP/R032823/1), eFutures Network (EP/S032045/1), Bio-inspired Adaptive Architectures and Systems (EP/K040820/1), Graceful (EP/L000563/1) and PAnDA (EP/I005838/1), a DSTL-funded grant of £128K and a KTP in High-speed Embedded Vision Systems for Search and Rescue. Recent EPSRC awards are highly cross-disciplinary projects investigating computational properties and creating novel architectures underpinned by principles from Biology, Physics and Electronics. I am a senior member of the IEEE, co-chair of the International Conference on Evolvable Systems (ICES), and chair of the IEEE Task Force on Evolvable Hardware.

Dr Rishad Shafik

University of Southampton

Dr Pantelis Georgiou

Imperial College London

Pantelis Georgiou currently holds the position of Reader (Associate Professor) in Biomedical Electronics at Imperial College London within the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. He is the head of the Bio-inspired Metabolic Technology Laboratory in the Centre for Bio-Inspired Technology; a multi-disciplinary group that invents, develops and demonstrates advanced micro-devices to meet global challenges in biomedical science and healthcare. His research includes ultra-low power micro-electronics, bio-inspired circuits and systems, lab-on-chip technology and application of micro-electronic technology to create novel medical devices. Application areas include new technologies for treatment of diabetes such as the artificial pancreas, novel Lab-on-Chip technology for genomics and diagnostics targeted towards infectious disease and antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and wearable technologies for rehabilitation of chronic conditions. 

Dr. Georgiou graduated with a 1st Class Honours MEng Degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering in 2004 and Ph.D. degree in 2008 both from Imperial College London. He then joined the Institute of Biomedical Engineering as Research Associate until 2010, when he was appointed Head of the Bio-inspired Metabolic Technology Laboratory. In 2011, he joined the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, where he currently holds an academic faculty position. He conducted pioneering work on the silicon beta cell and is now leading the project forward to the development of the first bio-inspired artificial pancreas for treatment of Type I diabetes. In addition to this, he made significant contributions to the development of integrated chemical-sensing systems in CMOS for Lab-on-Chip applications used in rapid diagnostics for infectious diseases. Dr. Georgiou is a senior member of the IEEE and IET and serves on the BioCAS and Sensory Systems technical committees of the IEEE CAS Society. He is an associate editor of the IEEE Sensors and TBioCAS journals. He is also the CAS representative on the IEEE sensors council. In 2013 he was awarded the IET Mike Sergeant Achievement Medal for his outstanding contributions to engineering and leading a multidisciplinary team to deliver innovative medical devices. In 2017, he was also awarded the IEEE Sensors Technical Achievement award in the area of Sensor systems for significant contributions in bioelectronics, and in 2018 he was awarded the Rosetrees Trust Interdisciplinary Award for the development of a rapid diagnostic test to accurately detect bacterial infection in children using microchip technology. He is currently an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer in Circuits and Systems, a role focused on shaping the global community in his field.

 

Dr Ivona Mitrovic

The University of Liverpool

Dr Srinjoy Mitra

University of Glasgow

Professor Kerstin Eder

Bristol University

I am Professor of Computer Science at the University of Bristol. I lead the Trustworthy Systems Laboratory and the Verification and Validation for Safety in Robots research theme at the Bristol Robotics Laboratory. I hold a PhD in Computational Logic, an MSc in Artificial Intelligence and an MEng in Informatics.

Industrial Steering Group Members

Mr Nigel Rix

Mr Nigel Rix

 Knowledge Transfer Network

 

I work for the Knowledge Transfer Network - heading up the team covering Enabling Technologies - primarily Electronics, Sensors and Photonics.

The Knowledge Transfer Network (KTN) helps businesses get the best out of creativity, ideas and the latest discoveries, to strengthen the UK economy and improve people’s lives.  KTN links new ideas and opportunities with expertise, markets and finance through our network of businesses, universities, funders and investors. From agri-food to autonomous systems and from energy to design, KTN combines in-depth knowledge in all sectors with the ability to cross boundaries.

We are the network partner of Innovate UK and help companies access Innovate UK funding for innovation and hte UK research base.

My personal interests are Smart Systems, Embedded AI, IoT

I am also part of the H2020 project inSSIght
This helps European industries active in the Smart Systems Sector .

 

Dr Andrea Kells

Dr Andrea Kells

 ARM

As Arm’s Director of European Research Ecosystem, I have responsibility for overseeing all of our European research partnerships and collaborations, including management and strategic oversight of major UK and EU research projects in which Arm is involved. I also liaise with colleagues in the US to support Arm’s international collaborations. Further information on the support we offer to academics can be found here.

Arm is the world’s leading technology provider of silicon IP and custom SoCs, and is the architecture of choice for more than 90% of the smart electronic products being designed today. We also deliver cloud services to allow organisations to securely manage the deployment of products throughout their lifecycle. And we sit at the centre of the world’s largest compute ecosystem, with our vast community of software, tools, and service partners supporting and enabling the use of our technology across markets and applications.

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrea-kells-bb889289/

ECR Steering Group Members

Dr Pantelis Georgiou

Imperial College London 

Pantelis Georgiou currently holds the position of Reader (Associate Professor) in Biomedical Electronics at Imperial College London within the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. He is the head of the Bio-inspired Metabolic Technology Laboratory in the Centre for Bio-Inspired Technology; a multi-disciplinary group that invents, develops and demonstrates advanced micro-devices to meet global challenges in biomedical science and healthcare. His research includes ultra-low power micro-electronics, bio-inspired circuits and systems, lab-on-chip technology and application of micro-electronic technology to create novel medical devices. Application areas include new technologies for treatment of diabetes such as the artificial pancreas, novel Lab-on-Chip technology for genomics and diagnostics targeted towards infectious disease and antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and wearable technologies for rehabilitation of chronic conditions. 

Dr. Georgiou graduated with a 1st Class Honours MEng Degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering in 2004 and Ph.D. degree in 2008 both from Imperial College London. He then joined the Institute of Biomedical Engineering as Research Associate until 2010, when he was appointed Head of the Bio-inspired Metabolic Technology Laboratory. In 2011, he joined the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, where he currently holds an academic faculty position. He conducted pioneering work on the silicon beta cell and is now leading the project forward to the development of the first bio-inspired artificial pancreas for treatment of Type I diabetes. In addition to this, he made significant contributions to the development of integrated chemical-sensing systems in CMOS for Lab-on-Chip applications used in rapid diagnostics for infectious diseases. Dr. Georgiou is a senior member of the IEEE and IET and serves on the BioCAS and Sensory Systems technical committees of the IEEE CAS Society. He is an associate editor of the IEEE Sensors and TBioCAS journals. He is also the CAS representative on the IEEE sensors council. In 2013 he was awarded the IET Mike Sergeant Achievement Medal for his outstanding contributions to engineering and leading a multidisciplinary team to deliver innovative medical devices. In 2017, he was also awarded the IEEE Sensors Technical Achievement award in the area of Sensor systems for significant contributions in bioelectronics, and in 2018 he was awarded the Rosetrees Trust Interdisciplinary Award for the development of a rapid diagnostic test to accurately detect bacterial infection in children using microchip technology. He is currently an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer in Circuits and Systems, a role focused on shaping the global community in his field.

 

Dr Ivona Mitrovic

The University of Liverpool 
DR. Elizabeth Rendon-Morales

Dr Elizabeth Rendon-Morales

University of Sussex Robotics and Mechatronics Systems Research Centre

Dr Rendon-Morales is a Senior lecturer in Electrical and Electronics Engineering in the Department of Engineering and Design at the University of Sussex. The main area of her research is the design, development and testing of the next generation of sensing electronic systems and medical instrumentation. Her areas of expertise include sensors, electronics, robotics and telemetry systems. Within the sensing area, She is leading the development of advanced sensing devices to monitor electrocardiogram -ECG signals on babies during early pregnancy and throughout labour. On the robotics area, She is leading the development of micron level precision instrumentation tools to achieve linearity and repeatability that could contribute to the next generation surgical autonomous robotic systems

Dr Srinjoy Mitra

University of Glasgow 
Dr Ian Sandall

Dr Ian Sandall

The University of Liverpool 

I am currently a lecturer in Electronic Engineering and Electronics at the University of Liverpool. Where my current research activities include III-V Nanowires, Dilute Bi and N containing semiconductors and GaN devices. I have a particular interest in utilizing these semiconductor materials and devices for bio-sensing applications.

I obtained my PhD in 2007 on the characterisation of In(Ga)As Quantum Dot Lasers and have since held posts in industry and academia working on a variety of semiconductor materials, devices and end applications. I have extensive experience of optical and electrical characterization of semiconductor materials and devices as well as in-depth knowledge and experience of semiconductor device fabrication. 

 

 

 
Photo Dr Martin Trefzer

Dr Martin Trefzer

University of York 

I am a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Electronic Engineering at York. My research interests include variability-aware analogue and digital hardware design, biologically motivated models of hardware design, evolutionary computation, and autonomous fault-tolerance. I am researching computational capabilities of CNTs, including direct evolution and reservoir computing models. My vision is to create novel architectures and autonomous systems, which are dynamically self-optimising and inherently fault-tolerant, by porting key enabling features and mechanisms from nature to hardware. I am/have been co-investigator on EPSRC-funded grants, Spin Inspired Representations (EP/R032823/1), eFutures Network (EP/S032045/1), Bio-inspired Adaptive Architectures and Systems (EP/K040820/1), Graceful (EP/L000563/1) and PAnDA (EP/I005838/1), a DSTL-funded grant of £128K and a KTP in High-speed Embedded Vision Systems for Search and Rescue. Recent EPSRC awards are highly cross-disciplinary projects investigating computational properties and creating novel architectures underpinned by principles from Biology, Physics and Electronics. I am a senior member of the IEEE, co-chair of the International Conference on Evolvable Systems (ICES), and chair of the IEEE Task Force on Evolvable Hardware.

Dr Rishad Shafik

University of Southampton University of Southampton

Dr Ruomeng Huang

University of Southampton 

Dr Ruomeng Huang is a lecturer in the Sustainable Electronic Technologies Group in the School of Electronics and Computer Science in the University of Southampton. His research involves functional chalcogenides and metal oxides with particular focus on application of novel non-volatile memory technologies (phase change memory and resistive switching memory) and thermoelectric (TE) materials and energy harvester. He is currently a Co-Investigator in a STFC grant (Selective Chemical Vapour Deposition for Production of Thermoelectric Micro-Generators for Energy Harvesting) for the development of thin film thermoelectric generators. He is also working in a EPSRC program grant (ADEPT – Advanced Devices by ElectroPlaTing) which explores the state of the art of electrodeposition and device design at the nanoscale in the areas of thermoelectrics, infrared detection, and phase change materials. He has published over 30 journal papers (Google Scholar) and delivered over 40 oral/poster presentations at national and international conferences. 

Dr Georgios Karakonstantis

Queens University Belfast